Buttercup’s End

Yesterday they started cutting the fields. Don’t be sad, it is part of the natural cycle of the farm. They are just coppicing the Buttercups.

Buttercup coppicing

Buttercup coppicing

Buttercup coppicingThe Buttercups will grow back bigger and stronger than ever before but they won’t look like this again until next May. Coppicing them now allows light to reach the floor and it starts a whole new spurt of growth with different flowers that wouldn’t otherwise stand much chance.

Those fields were full of all kinds of wildflowers, not just Buttercups, there were clovers and speedwells, Dandelions, Dock and all sorts of grasses and now they are going to feed animals. I am glad that they are using the fields in this way, it is much more interesting than just grazing them all year round.

These fields will be allowed to grow again and they will be cut again in the late summer and by then they will look just as full as they did yesterday with a whole different selection of flowers. Clover will fill them for a while that is another beautiful thing to see.

For now though, Fizz and I had the big responsibility of enjoying every minute of the day and we tried really hard to do just that πŸ™‚

Buttercups

Buttercups


She is what they call a “Companion Animal” but that is just another way of saying “Toy Dog.”

I consider myself to be “Young at Heart,” (Some people say, “In his second childhood,” that is not so kind but I suppose it amounts to the same thing. Young people think their marbles are so important but once you have lost them you forget that you ever had them and anyway they just hold you back)

“Young at Heart ” knows exactly what toys are for πŸ™‚

Companion Animal

Companion Animal

Companion Animal

Companion AnimalI used a little Dog there to illustrate the extraordinary beauty of the fields, as they were last week. Did you see how I did that?

Companion AnimalI did take a few photographs of a serious botanical nature but…

Common Sorrel

Common SorrelThey are for elsewhere, mostly we just played.

Second Childhood? Oh yes, bring it on.

Fizz and I have a new habitat to explore today as we struggle on with our serious botanical research, one where we won’t keep losing our ball πŸ™‚

I will let Fizz have the last word.

31 thoughts on “Buttercup’s End”

    1. Thanks Vicki πŸ™‚ For the last couple of weeks those squeaks have been the only way that I could find her in those fields. Once she has got her ball she lies down and plays with it, if it didn’t squeak she’d be gone πŸ™‚

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    1. Thank you John πŸ™‚ Absolutely! Um… quite a few people will be sitting at home enjoying the noise that Fizz makes but yes I get your point, they are probably doolally as well πŸ™‚

      It is like the satisfaction you feel when you spend all of your day trying to get one over on the smarty pants dog and then you finally win one….

      Liked by 1 person

  1. I love when dogs figure out that a toy squeaks. There is such joy in the squeaking. Unfortunately my dogs have a tendency to perform squeakectomies so they are not allowed to have these toys unsupervised. Loved the buttercups.

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    1. Thank you Virginia πŸ™‚ I don’t know if you can get them in Maryland but have a look for that brand I am giving her “Kong” they make good dog toys. I used to give my German Shepherd Kong toys and he was a powerful animal, he never broke one πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Joy πŸ™‚ Are there no Buttercups where you live? Then how do you know who likes butter? In England we hold a buttercup under their chin and if their chin glows yellow they like butter. Your soirees must be chaos πŸ™‚

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      1. Oh my, yes, Colin! At least in the Pacific Northwest, we children all ran around shoving buttercups underneath each others’ chins. These tests are convenient in country schools, because buttercups could often be found in the grass at the edge of the playgrounds. It seems like nearly everyone liked butter, but possibly there was some yellow pollen sticking to us, and marring the scientific results…

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  2. As I watched Fizz play in the fields, I wondered how my dog, Gem, would enjoy running free like that.Suburbia doesn’t give him much room off lead. He does love squeaky toys. So do I, stepping on as many as I can around the house.

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    1. Thank you Anne πŸ™‚ I know. I used to live in town with two Collies and a GSD. Fizz has her own private paradise (100 acres of it) and she has no idea how lucky she is.

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  3. Every time I see a field of Buttercups I still can’t get over how beautiful they really are. I am sitting here listening to the thud of a baler gathering up the cut hay from a nearby field. Seems early to me though?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Julie πŸ™‚ Sadly our fields were cut for silage and the cut grass has already been taken away for pickling. Some of our neighbours will make hay and then the grass is spread out in the fields to dry and that is one of the beautiful scents of summer, fresh hay πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Buttercups are lovely and you certainly have a lot of them there! (They do grow here in the US, at least in New England.) I like adding them to my flower arrangements. I see all the gulls taking care of the unfortunate victims of mowing. Nothing is wasted in nature in the great circle of life.
    Nice to see you spoil Fizz the way you spoil the birds! πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Eliza πŸ™‚ Yes the gulls are feasting in the fields at the moment. It is a shame that they have to be cut at all but it is better this way. If he grazed them continually then the grass would be kept short all year long. At least this way I get wildflowers πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Those buttercups are lovely and I can’t help being sad when I see them cut. I am currently a little annoyed with some new fairly near neighbours. They bought an old tumbledown house and demolished it and built themselves a new one. Between their property and the lane is a very wide verge which is common land. They have mown it very short and continue to keep it short like the grass in their garden. Last year there were all sorts of flowers growing there including two types of orchid. The local farmer usually cuts the verges later in the summer for silage, after the flowers have gone to seed.

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    1. Thank you Clare πŸ™‚ It is a very similar situation here. The forest is peppered with small villages and it is a proud local custom that all of the grass verges are maintained by the residents. That is the main reason that the boar are unpopular here, they dig up those lovely green verges. So the locals call for the Forestry Commission to shoot more guns at them and drive more of them out of the forest. If they just let them live in the forest they wouldn’t be in the villages. Idiots! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Maureen πŸ™‚ The Buttercups are lovely, the Clover is nice when that comes but oh how I would like Poppies. I am seeing a few about now but they don’t fill our fields the way that they could.

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  6. “An English term for a traditional method of woodland management.” Not only did I learn the definition of a new word, but lucky me, I learned about the tradition of coppicing, as a result of looking up the term. Raised in a logging family, I find that forest management is always of interest. This method, by which trees can be managed for centuries, is particularly fascinating. πŸ™‚

    And a promotion for the buttercups, to be managed like the big plants.

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    1. Thanks Crystal πŸ™‚ Most of our British woodland was once actively coppiced. It started to decline in the 1800’s when other products became available. Coal replaced firewood, wire replaced the hop poles, that sort of thing. About 200 years ago native coppiced woodland was replanted with non-native Sweet Chestnut. I used to see this as a massive environmental disaster because non-native is not good for wildlife and we replanted about half of all of our woodland with non-native species. Today though an awful lot of this coppice is derelict and unmanaged, it just isn’t economical and my own experience is that these are the best places to look for wildlife. Animals like unmanaged woodland, they are becoming sanctuaries for our Deer and Boar and Badgers. Worked, native coppice is a brilliant wildlife habitat but there isn’t very much of it left but the non-native and abandoned coppice is becoming quite useful. It is not great for birds because there are not so many insects and these woods can seem a bit quiet but native trees are slowly reclaiming the land and at night the shadows start to move. It is very good for the bigger animals that need somewhere to hide.

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